Dark Qiviut

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Dark Qiviut last won the day on November 12 2016

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About Dark Qiviut

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  • Birthday 04/10/1987

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  1. Give credit to Miami. They played fine tonight against the Pats. :)

    1. Captain Clark

      Captain Clark

      They did but you also have to put some blame on New England. Especially Tom Brady. He played absolutely horrible. Two interceptions and completed under 60% of his passes. 

    2. Dark Qiviut

      Dark Qiviut

      And had a Miami defensive line that was smothering him.

    3. Captain Clark

      Captain Clark

      Absolutely. He was getting hit more and harder than any 40 year old should. 

  2. Note: Credit to @Anti-Villain for linking to the trope on the EQD Forums several months ago, eventually leading me to inspiration for this thread. This thread is also connected to two other threads I created a while ago. One of S5's biggest strengths (aside from using the mane character's strengths to dominate the story at time) is telling a really mature story. When done right, it pulls no punches and tells a really compelling story with often mature and gray morals. S7 follows up that level of maturity in many episodes, too, but also adds another important element into it: not dominating one side of the conflict. Named "Both Sides Have a Point" on TV Tropes, several episodes present the audience both sides of the story and expanded upon that. Examples include: Parental Glideance: Windy and Bow sometimes act really hyper and get to the point of sometimes embarrassing Dash by accident. Can it get overbearing? Depends on your perspective. However, Scootaloo doesn't have parents around her all the time and dreams of having parents like them, because she feels neglected back home and doesn't have parents that stick around and really appreciate her. So, was Dash justified to feel upset at them for crossing the line? Yes. Was she justified to suggest disownment of them because they embarrass her? No! She really crossed a major line and showed a lack of appreciation for both their support and sacrifices. The episode and moral are right on the money. Forever Filly: Rarity's overbearing attitude was written to be in the wrong, and the motive to trigger it was really flimsy, but she has a really good point. She loves SB and wants to generate the memories that bonded them. OTOH, Sweetie Belle isn't interested in those same passions, but doesn't exactly say she's too old to abandon them altogether. She has a really important job and doesn't want to neglect it. Perfect Pear: One of the grandest daddies here. While the Pears' and Apples' tribal hatred of each other is very silly in today's world, it wasn't the case back then, both in Equestrian timeline and our own. Both families competed for supremacy and profit in Ponyville, leading to this lifelong feud. Given historical context, you can see where they come from. Additionally, so do BC and Bright: They loved each other too much for their families to separate them. But this plot presentation was used rather sparingly. Then To Change a Changeling aired, foreshadowing a major shift in the story structures for the rest of the season. Sure, TCaC could've written off Pharynx as some stereotypical throwback grump who hated change "just because" and wanted things to be the way they are. Instead, Lappin went for the high road: Pharynx hates the way the hive's run, because the Changeling kingdom is so complacent and doesn't prepare to keep the hive and its inhabitants safe. He has a very solid point, and luring the Maulwurf away doesn't guarantee their safety. When Haber returned to the show, the gray approach to conflicts took off: Daring Done?: Daring's upset from the collateral damage she caused. While the episode could've absolved her of her guilt and paint Somnambula's residents as the bad guys, DD? doesn't do that. At least, not entirely. She learns at the very end to be more aware of her actions and the consequences they may carry. Secondly, the citizens are absolutely justified to be upset at the statue being destroyed. Somnambula was so important to the town that destroying her statue comes across as a desecration of their ancestry and history. Mane Thing: Despite being told in Rarity's POV, the episode paints neither her nor the citizens of Ponyville as the bad guy. Rarity's justifiably upset for losing her mane, and thus loses her voice. She covers herself from embarrassment and says nothing, but Ponyville doesn't recognize her, consequently. A Health of Info: Twilight is absolutely right; Fluttershy needs to rest. The episode hammers in that lesson: FS catches swamp fever from Zecora, because she wouldn't sleep (shooting her immune system), while Twilight did. However, AHoI goes out of its way to make you understand Fluttershy's position. She believes she caused Zecora to catch it and would do whatever it takes to help her heal. Can you blame FS for thinking this way? Not at all. Marks and Recreation: S7's most underrated episode, outside of All Bottled Up. Rumble was the episode's antagonist, but he has very real reasons to fear getting his cutie mark. He loves everything he does, and he fears getting a mark will ruin his love for them. Rather than shooting him down, M&R justifies it: Apple Bloom loves making potions with Zecora, and Rumble asks her when she last did it. She couldn't answer. Was his approach (sabotaging the camp and making everyone bored) extreme? Yes. But his fears weren't unfounded. The climax handles his fear brilliantly: letting Thunderlane (a WB) lead the charge by giving everyone at the camp activities they love doing, and Rumble joins in. Zeppelin: Fame written correctly. The fans have a very real reason to be on the cruise and are treated like real people. Star Tracker's awkwardness wasn't excused, but he wasn't a stereotype, either; he's a kid who's eager to mke an impression. Think about this. If you won the opportunity to be with someone you idolize, would you be excited or nervous, too? Probably so. Most importantly, Twilight also has a point. She joined the cruise to hope she'll spend quality time with her family, and she accepted IW's deal so she and everyone else would be happy. She was justifiably hurt when she missed a moment so dear to her, but the episode acknowledges that taking her anger out on her family and not sincerely apologizing to Star for accidentally stepping on his hoof was out of line. Rather than undergoing the clichéd result of having fun and damn everyone else, Cadance informs her that she can establish her own boundaries, and Twilight asks everyone for peace. Uncommon Bond: Starlight understandably wants to bond more with Sunburst however she could, but Sunburst also has his own pastimes and accidentally gets caught up with her closest friends instead. Starlight's magic trick (changing the scene and themselves as if they were kids) was creepy, but it's in character, and the episode doesn't demonize her or him for that. Shadow Play: The granddaddy of this presentation. SP wasn't your straightforward good-vs.-evil story, even though the villains and heroes are established. Villains aren't completely encased in a vacuum. Heroes have their flaws and missteps, turning them into fuller beings. SP presented a high-quality story where you can understand everyone's perspective. That's how gray the conflict is. The Pillars are absolutely justified to feel upset at Stygian, accuse him of trying to steal their magic, and eject him from their group. During a very dark time in Equestria, Stygian stole their priceless artifacts and told them nothing about it. It was not a magically friendly era. But Stygian is also a person. He feels worthless in their group, since he's basically Equestria's Squib. Yes, he was wrong to steal, but you can see where he's coming from. Becoming one with the Pony of Shadows gives him status equal to his ex-friends, because the PoS listened and comforted him. On the other side, Twilight's reason to release Star Swirl et al from Limbo was really short-sighted of her, but her motives were also justifiable. Star Swirl and the Pillars altogether are Equestria's most important figures, and bringing them back can help make Equestria in a safer place. Unfortunately, she completely overlooked the PoS, and SS was rightfully ticked at her for it. She was so embarrassed for what she did that she did that she'll do anything to prove to him she's no slouch or idiot. With the PoS released and Ponehnge destroyed, the Elements were needed to push him back to Limbo and keep the Realm secure. But what the RM7 knew about the PoS was the story Sunburst told them and the Pillars' side of the story. To use the Elements to banish him again stung Starlight Glimmer, a former villain. Blasting them felt so extreme and didn't go after the source of the problem. Her strength as a detective took over here, and she was able to piece together the jigsaw puzzle. Seasons four and five really brought forth a mature approach to storytelling in FIM by telling really risky and adult conflicts and attaching gray morals, but S7's presentation feels even more mature by telling really gray stories. Many earlier seasons' conflicts were mostly one-sided, although they did go to a middleground at times; whether they succeeded or not depended on the execution. So, why is it important to tell a gray story? Like telling a deep moral or theme, you're showing a respect to the audiences watching it. FIM is an all-ages, family-family program with very young kids as the base demographic. Like I wrote in one of the threads linked above, kids may not the mature brain development as adults, but they understand respect. You're not talking down to them by writing a deep, multi-sided story. High-quality, gray stories show children stories and characters don't have to be so black and white. Some of FIM's best episodes prior to S7 — like Sisterhooves, Amending Fences, Mane Attraction, Lesson Zero, Winter Wrap Up, Testing Testing, Flight, Fault, and Times — were told through a multi-sided conflict. S7B ran with this trope and was successful most of the time. The majority of S7B would not have benefited without that complex approach. So, here are some questions for those reading my thread: What episode(s) would greatly benefit by telling a multi-sided conflict than one only? How would you revise the episode to make it better? What do you feel about S7's gray approach to their stories? Do you hope Seasons 8 and beyond continue to follow through it? Do you have any possible episode ideas that could tackle a conflict while validating both or more points equally? How would you go about it? Which episodic themes do you want to see tackled in a multi-sided perspective rather than have just one shot down and ignored?
  3. Hi, how's it going? :) It's been a while.

    1. Show previous comments  9 more
    2. WaterPulse

      WaterPulse

      ^S'all right, man. That piece of advice is still helpful.

      As for your earlier question, you know how Applejack spent the entire second act of "Honest Apple" being needlessly mean to the fashion ponies? I was thinking of having Starlight at least attempt to do some damage control by trying to apply some of Twilight's lessons before her anger gets the better of her, instead of being 100% antagonistic.

    3. Dark Qiviut

      Dark Qiviut

      Ah. Makes sense. Her anger/temper is a really big flaw that SG had a real tough time controlling. Maybe DT or SS do something by accident that causes her to finally trigger it?

    4. WaterPulse

      WaterPulse

      Yeah, especially given Diamond and Silver's equally abrasive personalities in their appearances in the first five seasons.

  4. I'll never understand the hatred for Glideance's moral. Was Dash right to be upset at her parents? Absolutely. But was she right to yell at them, swat Bow's hoof away, belittle them, and suggest that she wants nothing to do with 'em anymore because she embarrassed them? Heck, no! She took her parents' joy, love, and dedication for her for granted and considered all of it interference. Not a lot of people are that lucky to have such supporting parents; Scootaloo looked up to Bow and Windy, because they are the parents she yearned for and appreciated them. The moral shown and expressed was right on the money.

  5. "Being in character or likeable doesn't make the actions okay."

    It's a lesson I said a lot when it came to FIM, and the same applies to other shows, too. An action may make sense to the character, but if what he, she, or they committed is stupid, mean, or any other negative trait, and if it affects the story, you need something to tell the audience the story won't tolerate that kind of behavior. Soos is stupid with a heart of gold. Stan's an asshole and, to quote Mother's Basement in his GF review, "a conman with a heart of passable gold substitute." There needs to be consequences for their actions, and they have to be addressed by other characters and /or the story itself.

    Land Before Swine handles this perfectly. Before the intro, the episode doesn't portray either of them in the right.

    1. Soos's stupidity historically makes the situation worse for both the twins and himself. Although it started harmlessly, Dipper's already frustrated with him accidentally destroying the film. When he nearly runs himself over, Dipper confined to Mabel, worried that he'll only worsen their journey to rescue Waddles. As it turns out, he does — winds the ball of yarn and destroys the lamp, both without any malice. Dip's frustration mirrors our own, because without him, they'll probably rescue Waddles by now. In Dip's POV, Stan ain't taking Mabel's feelings seriously, and when you see how carefree and absentminded he behaves, you can see where he's coming from.
    2. Grunkle Stan is an asshole, and a lovable one at that. All series, his behavior landed him with some consequence, traditionally ones not affecting him. LBS's the first one where he encounters something supernatural and goes on a supernatural adventure, and with the others working to hide it from him, it's a big twist of events for us viewers. Stan breaking his promise to Mab is the perfect time for him to witness a supernatural creature (and nearly make him pay for it).

      But when he tries to be a bigger asshole by lying to her and saying it out of the blue when witnessing the underground cave of hibernating dinosaurs (with great use of continuity from The Deep End), Mabel was completely justified to be angry at him for reasons already stated. As long established both here and in the past, she and the pig are really tight, and losing Waddles means losing a really dear family member. If he won't care about Waddles, then why the hell should Mabel care about Stan? The voice acting (with Mabel's voice breaking as she disowns him) adds so much emotional weight to both the overarching theme of maturation and episode's of regaining trust.

    Aside from them doing bad or stupid things, LBS adds one more caveat: make them fix the problems.

    1. While they're trapped, Soos gets an epiphany, understanding how clumsy he is and may commit actions that really bother Dipper, but lets him know he's a good guy. Yet, even though he's dim, he's very instinctual. When he sees how the baby pterodactyl is looking, he knows how far apart their eyes are, so walking in a straight line takes advantage of his blind spot and allows them to escape the nest. Then when there's virtually no way out, he uses his strength to burst them up the geyser.
    2. When Stan tries to use Waddles as dino bait, he eventually realizes (through clever voice-acting and visual subtlety) how much Mabel really means to him. She's his niece, and both care for each other. If he loves her, he'll keep Waddles safe. And he does just that: strapping Waddles on his back and punching the pterodactyl to protect him. The adventure brought all three closer, and he tolerates Waddles now.

    This is in complete contrast to Old Man McGucket. He was absolutely reckless, completely unaware that his stupidity worsened their predicament, and continued to get into trouble. Reaching out to touch the baby pterodactyl was his grandest (and most gruesome) mistake.

    Mr. E didn't give it an Admiral for no reason. Land Before Swine tackles both jerkiness and stupidity, but rather than tolerate it, they inflict consequences to the story, the plot puts them in the wrong, and highlights their best qualities to help everyone resolve it and regain everyone's trust. It's a more difficult plot to handle, but done spectacularly. So far, the best episode of the series! :D


    Grades:

    1. Tourist Trapped: A-
    2. The Legend of the Gobblewonker: C+
    3. Headhunters: A
    4. The Hand That Rocks the Mabel: A
    5. The Inconceiving: C+
    6. Dipper Vs. Manliness: A-
    7. Double Dipper: B
    8. Irrational Treasure: C
    9. The Time Traveler's Pig: A
    10. Fight Fighters: A
    11. Little Dipper: B-
    12. Summerween: A
    13. Boss Mabel: C+
    14. Bottomless Pit!: B-
    15. The Deep End: B-
    16. Carpet Diem: A-
    17. Boyz Crazy: D+
    18. Land Before Swine: A+
  6. Boyz Crazy done.

    No way to cut it. Aside from their often-animalistic behavior, Sev'ral Timez and their five members are nothing more than quarter-dimensional, boy-band stereotypes. There's nothing about them to actually differentiate from each other, sans the clothing and outdated, 1990's jargon. Their "personalities" are flatter than cardboard and can be shared from any of them aside from their clothes and slang. Jargon/slang is repeated way too often, flattening the dialogue and aging the gags real quickly. Every joke from them comes from being associated with the Dreamboat sub-stereotype of boy bands, acting like animals, or both without any extra dimension behind them; they're quick, shallow, forced, and repetitive. You can have one of these characters, add more dimension to make the character rounder, and write out the others entirely. Because they lack creativity, it's very difficult to care for them and their desires to be free from Ergman Bratsman. All five being trapped in a large hamster cage makes Bratsman really evil and controlling, but because he doesn't appear so often and is written out 2/3 of the way through, he loses his presence as a threat.

    Other jokes related to the A-plot don't work, too. Candy ramming into the soda vendor was pointless, and Grenda making out with a Sev'ral Timez cover was cringeworthy.

    Unfortunately, Mabel's desperation for keeping them in the Shack becomes contrived, too. Sure, every guy she liked ended in separation, but the episode doesn't do enough to show us why being around them matters so much to her. Being confined to a short braiding scene and a montage ain't enough. Give more time to grow Mabel's attachment to them. How? Maybe she helped them learn how to eat and drink, talk without relying on forced slang, new clothes to scream individual personalities for each, being able to walk on two feet instead of four all the time. Sure, the pacing would be pretty quick, and the beginning might have to be cut a bit, but Mabel helping them grow up and adapt within maybe a day or two would help her feels like she contributed to GF society and made their lives better. They'll feel indebted to her, and vice-versa. So when she does let them go (probably to a new house to something), freeing them will break her heart, but be the right thing to do.

    However, they keep their animalism and are released into the wild. Candy's line of them not lasting a day made their release really unsettling. Sev'ral Timez has no idea what food, water, trees, dirt, daylight, or probably a bathroom are. One of them almost choked to death from swallowing a tape dispenser. The forest of Gravity Falls is very dangerous, and they're completely unprepared to survive out there. What if they come across a bear, cougar, rattlesnake, or a supernatural demon? They can't defend themselves, 'cause for all we know, they don't know they exist. Mabel not forcing them to live in her room was the right idea, but the implications aren't thought out at all.

    Thankfully, the B-plot saves it from completely tanking. Dipper's wild theory of Robbie hypnotizing Wendy fits in his character and continues to progress their rivalry, but he also feels justified. The CD, packaging, and way he sang to her made him suspicious. Stan believing Dipper foreshadows the future of the series (and calls back to Tourist Trapped's last scene of Stan sneaking off behind the soda vendor). The episode subverts the accusation of hypnotism to Wendy being rightfully mad at Robbie for plagiarizing another band. She's justified to break up with him. Though she acted misandrist towards Dipper, it's not hard to understand where she's coming from. Wendy was betrayed one too many times and doesn't appreciate Dipper's lack of foresight after she felt hurt. Kudos to Stan for giving Dip words of encouragement after he felt terrible for what he did. There were also two really great jokes here:

    1. Stan spitting his soda in Dipper's face after the song may be a mind-controlling scheme when rewound.
    2. Stan ramming into a blocked road.

    Even though the B-plot's good, the awful A-plot really sinks this episode.


    Grades:

    1. Tourist Trapped: A-
    2. The Legend of the Gobblewonker: C+
    3. Headhunters: A
    4. The Hand That Rocks the Mabel: A
    5. The Inconceiving: C+
    6. Dipper Vs. Manliness: A-
    7. Double Dipper: B
    8. Irrational Treasure: C
    9. The Time Traveler's Pig: A
    10. Fight Fighters: A
    11. Little Dipper: B-
    12. Summerween: A
    13. Boss Mabel: C+
    14. Bottomless Pit!: B-
    15. The Deep End: B-
    16. Carpet Diem: A-
    17. Boyz Crazy: D+
  7. Finished The Deep End (Gravity Falls, Ep. 15).

    There's a boatload of comedy here in this episode. When the comedy lands, it lands really well. The best ones are Soos telling Dipper not to think about why the sun on his towel wears sunglasses, Mabel sneaking about to get to know Mermando, Mabel sighing in relief after realizing he doesn't have a girlfriend. Some dark jokes, like the pool boss revealing his prosthetic hand, Mermando not being able to breathe when beached, and Stan's back catching fire work real well. Initially, the Jail Pool Kid worked well as a dark joke, but because he was left there for too long, the joke became less funny and more sad, if not mean-spirited.

    Gideon makes his return, and that white-haired SOB remains as devious as ever. XD He and Stan continue their rivalry, but he reveals his cleverness and intelligence by always having some backup plan in case Grunkle Stan wants to take his spot. This show uses its continuity to its advantage, and TDE ain't no exception.

    This episode focuses a lot on Mabel, her crush angle, and getting to know Mermando while fulfilling her kiss dream. No, she ain't afraid to admit lusting over him, but as she gets to know him, begins to appreciate him for his caring personality. When he reveals how much he misses his family, she decides to help him, a side of her personality that rounds her character.

    The pacing here was really tight, although maybe a little quicker than others. Probably because the show uses jump cuts rather extensively, and the scenes go through rather quickly. There's a lot of content here, and it crams it through. But if there's one scene that doesn't work at all, it's the climax. The episode tends to rush his beached scenes and plug in a lot of comedy here, but this is the first time where he actually shows great danger, but the scene plugs in a quick "I think I'm dying" joke, and Mabel takes a picture of both Dip and the dying Mermando "kissing," severely downplaying the serious situation. Mermando telling them both they could've dragged him to the lake undercuts the tone more.

    Act 3 and the pacing can be filtered a bit (and the climax given more dignity), but it does a nice job overall.


    Grades (Boss Mabel grade changed):

    1. Tourist Trapped: A-
    2. The Legend of the Gobblewonker: C+
    3. Headhunters: A
    4. The Hand That Rocks the Mabel: A
    5. The Inconceiving: C+
    6. Dipper Vs. Manliness: A-
    7. Double Dipper: B
    8. Irrational Treasure: C
    9. The Time Traveler's Pig: A
    10. Fight Fighters: A
    11. Little Dipper: B-
    12. Summerween: A
    13. Boss Mabel: B- C+
    14. Bottomless Pit!: B-
    15. The Deep End: B-/B
  8. Clinton campaign, I have a protip: The Russia boogeyman didn't cost Clinton the election. Who cost her the election? The campaign for colluding with the DNC, sucking up to big corporate interests, Clinton's skeletons in her closet (both recent and otherwise), and Clinton being too egotistical to campaign in Wisconsin and Michigan till it was too late. Trump's win was Clinton's own doing.

    But the Clinton campaign has its head so far up its ass that when Brazile outed the collusion, they had the gall to cowardly accuse her of being Putin's lapdog. Russia has already been treated as a Neo-McCarthyist scapegoat for quite some time now to cover up the political process's and the Clinton campaign's own failures. Jesse Ferguson and every idiot who signed his open letter to her made that xenophobic scapegoat a racist one, too.

  9. S7 episode rank, from best to worst! 

    1. The Perfect Pear: A+ (best of the franchise)
    2. Shadow Play: A+ (best two-parter)
    3. Parental Glideance: A+
    4. Marks and Recreation: A
    5. Discordant Harmony: A-
    6. Uncommon Bond: A-
    7. Once Upon a Zeppelin: A-
    8. It Isn't the Mane Thing About You: A-
    9. All Bottled Up: A-
    10. A Flurry of Emotions: B+
    11. To Change a Changeling: B+
    12. Triple Threat: B-
    13. A Health of Information: B-
    14. Celestial Advice: B-
    15. Not Asking for Trouble: B-
    16. Campfire Tales: C+
    17. Rock Solid Friendship: C+
    18. Forever Filly: C+
    19. Daring Done: C+
    20. Fluttershy Leans In: C
    21. A Royal Problem: D+
    22. Secrets and Pies: D
    23. Honest Apple: F
    24. Hard to Say Anything: F
    25. Fame and Misfortune: F (third-worst of the series)
  10. Hey, Dark! :)

    1. Show previous comments  3 more
    2. WaterPulse

      WaterPulse

      I heard someone got a leak of the game early and started streaming it until Sega told them to stop. Oddly, both parties are polite about the whole thing.

    3. Dark Qiviut

      Dark Qiviut

      Eeyup. That's confirmed.

    4. WaterPulse

      WaterPulse

      I think at one point, they said Eggman had been torturing Sonic for months. I guess Sonic was strapped to a chair and forced to watch Sonic '06 and Rise Of Lyric* over and over.

      *I was originally gonna say Super Mario Odyssey, but something tells me Sonic might actually enjoy that.

  11. Finished Bottomless Pit! Mabel's story is the best of the four. Finding those truth teeth because she's sick of Stan lying and scheming everyone makes sense, as kids normally have a B&W worldview of lying. The moral presented — sometimes lying is the best solution to solving a problem — is really gray (for a family-friendly show) and nicely framed. Some things, like Stan's gross revelations, are best left unsaid.

    If I have to place them all in order, from best to worst (with a grade):

    1. Mabel: B+
    2. Stan: B-
    3. Dipper: B-
    4. Soos: C-

    Avoid the racial stereotyping, cultural appropriation, and unfortunate implications, and you got something real good.


    Grades:

    1. Tourist Trapped: A-
    2. The Legend of the Gobblewonker: C+
    3. Headhunters: A
    4. The Hand That Rocks the Mabel: A
    5. The Inconceiving: C+
    6. Dipper Vs. Manliness: A-
    7. Double Dipper: B
    8. Irrational Treasure: C
    9. The Time Traveler's Pig: A
    10. Fight Fighters: A
    11. Little Dipper: B-
    12. Summerween: A
    13. Boss Mabel: B-
    14. Bottomless Pit!: B-
  12. Summerween is a type of gem that would make the writers of Courage the Cowardly Dog salivate. Being Halloween, it ain't fun without being creepy, and the Summerween Trickster is a horri-licious delight. He shows how creepy he can be, both from his physique and swallowing that poor child whole like an egg-eating snake. The Jack-O-Melon may sound silly, but the Trickster's presence and usage of it as a clock turns it into an hourglass of life or death.

    Yet, there's a great contrast of wanting to impress Wendy. Despite being twelve, he wants to grow up as quickly as possible and not embarrass himself in front of both her and Robbie. In what could be just one creepy kid-friendly slasher episode, it adds great subtlety into his conscience. He wants to go to the party, but doesn't want to disappoint his friends or Mabel. "What am I gonna do?" and how he said it really add that depth into the conflict without telling you directly to your face.

    But it isn't only just staring at Mabel's scrapbook and Summerween poster. Occasionally, he stares at his watch. By doing that, he reinforces his wish to be there without wanting to hurt Mabel's feelings. However, can you blame her when she finds out he plans to ditch them once the candy's collected? Not at all. Mabel wants to have fun and be scared — y'know, live like a little kid.

    The one real flaw in this episode, and which Mr. E is on point with, is Mabel admitting to Dipper she wanted to trick or treat with Dipper so bad because she doesn't know how many she'll be able to do left. On one hand, it breaks some of the suspense from the scene; there's a lot at stake here, including the threat of death, and it doesn't feel like the proper time story-wise to insert this fear. Conversely, it also shows another personal side from Mabel. Although Dipper wants to show like he's growing up to Wendy and himself, Mabel's the opposite of that. It's foreshadowed (although a little too subtly) by how she wants to live this trick or treat night to the fullest in Act 2.

    Soos's decision to start up that bobblehead toy was really stupid, but it got some much-needed consequences for him, leading to the battle and eventual admission by the Trickter to just be appreciated. At the end, the Tricker turns from really creepy and terrifying to sad and personal. How fitting for Soos to eat him up (including what looked like his heart — talk about black comedy).

    Overall, an excellent episode, one of GF's best.


    Grades:

    1. Tourist Trapped: A-
    2. The Legend of the Gobblewonker: C+
    3. Headhunters: A
    4. The Hand That Rocks the Mabel: A
    5. The Inconceiving: C+
    6. Dipper Vs. Manliness: A-
    7. Double Dipper: B
    8. Irrational Treasure: D+
    9. The Time Traveler's Pig: A
    10. Fight Fighters: A
    11. Little Dipper: B-
    12. Summerween: A
  13. Done with Little Dipper. Teasing and making fun of each other can be fun to read to read and write, but sometimes watching it between close friends and relatives can be a little too unsettling. Dipper being teased for his height (which he can't control) was teasing too far. As a result, Dipper shows to be the most sympathetic and empathetic, even though he gloated over being really good at many games. Soos did the right thing calling her and Stan in on their mocking, though he accidentally contributed to Dipper's internal conflict.

    Although Mabel's in character, this episode is her worst appearance yet. Not only for making fun of Dipper's height, but for being stupid here, too. She was easily baited by Gideon's gummy bears, whispered to Dipper about the crystal's properties while Gid was a few inches away, and then became mesmerized by Gideon's beautiful hair. It didn't show her in the most positive light.

    Their bickering has serious consequences, including having Soos shrunk, too. They realize their mistake and apologize while trapped in the salt shaker, making their teasing in the beginning a little easier to swallow, no pun intended.

    Gideon goes into crazy bitch mode. Lots of jokes (including the tickle bomb in the climax) at his expense were really great, but Jesus Christ, what a brat! No wonder why his mom's so nervous around him!

    Overall, a fine episode, but not one I'll likely watch again anytime soon.


    Grades (Inconceiving and Vs. Manliness have singular grades now):

    1. Tourist Trapped: A-
    2. The Legend of the Gobblewonker: C+
    3. Headhunters: A
    4. The Hand That Rocks the Mabel: A
    5. The Inconceiving: C+
    6. Dipper Vs. Manliness: A-
    7. Double Dipper: B
    8. Irrational Treasure: D+
    9. The Time Traveler's Pig: A
    10. Fight Fighters: A
    11. Little Dipper: B-
  14. Why is Stan such a good scammer? Because he can sniff out scams when he sees 'em. Outwitted Gideon's scheme to transfer the Shack ownership to him and later swatted open the jar of termites that wanted Gideon's head. XP