KiiKrindar

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About KiiKrindar

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    kiikrindar

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  1. KiiKrindar

    Last to Post: EqD Edition

    No problem!
  2. Ion King - a biography of Michael Faraday
  3. KiiKrindar

    My fact is

    I promised to research how do ternary computers work and here is what I learned. (it's basically compilation of what I learned from two videos liked below, so if you want more visual aids I reccomend the first one, a little more history - the second one or all of this if you have nothing better to do at the moment ;-)) Computers we use are digital machines, which means they use signals that can be expressed in discrete values or more simply - as integers. This is in opposite to analog machines and signals, which use a spectrum of values, of which we can think as real numbers. The thing is, take any electrical measure - voltage for example - and its value is inherently analog. It is a spectrum. How do we deal with sending a digital signal over an analog medium? Do we even have to? We could just send whatever voltage over a wire and do computations this way. Lets send a hundred volts on one wire, fifty on the second, add those, output on one fifty volts on third wire, voila! But now we have a whole different range of problems, biggest of all - it's very hard to sustain the same voltage over the whole wire. It will drop with the length, it can get interference, etc. Instead, lets divide the spectrum into parts. If we have a range of 10 volts (-5 to 5) we can of course divide it into as many parts as we want, but the more space between, less errors can be made along the way. Divide it into 10 parts, you get nice decimal values, but only 1V of margin per value. But divide it into two (aka binary) and you have a lot of space per value, so the chance the machine will confuse one for another is very small. This is how we get analog signal to send digital data. Now, dividing it in two is nice, but it requires to encode all numbers into base 2 system. And now what we expressed as 2016 becomes 11111100000 and requires more data to be sent. More data requires more circuitry, more circuitry means higher cost, more maintenance, etc. So naturally a question arises - is there a sweet spot where we could use less circuits, but don't compromise on precision? Russians thought - let's just go a notch higher. And lets not encode numbers in base 3. Instead, they used balanced ternary system. All computation can be expressed as a series of logical conditions. Binary seems perfect for logic, we have true and false, we know how to deal with those. But ternary has a third value - unknown. If you ever used SQL databases - think of it as a null value. This is also a very good logical system, albeit with a lot of variants. We don't know which one Setun project used, but it doesn't matter. What matters, using balanced ternary and ternary logic they managed to create a cheaper computer, which had to use less parts and those were very precious in Soviet Russia - vacuum tubes were not easy to obtain. The end of the project came with invention of transistor, which replaced the vacuum tubes. And still, the binary computer that took place of Setun took 2.5 more money to be produced. As far as technical details of the Setun itself - I got nothing. Probably they still wait, classified, in some forgotten archive in Moscow, until one day someone will find them.
  4. KiiKrindar

    Last to Post: EqD Edition

    I'm spreading the knowledge of makówki, and incredible food we only eat in Silesia for Christmas Eve. Hope this is relevant to the topic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Makówki
  5. Nice to see some good traditional art posted. We're under represented with all this fancy people who have and know how to use a tablet. Good job with your artworks, hope to see more of them!
  6. KiiKrindar

    Sketches galore

    Also, made it! DA: http://kiikrindar.deviantart.com/art/Seventh-episode-Dragon-652936647 Tumblr: http://kiikrindar.tumblr.com/post/154864985593/aka-fluttershy-kicks-butt-time-taken-about-15
  7. KiiKrindar

    Sketches galore

    Yes, it is a time consuming task. I usually try to limit myself to max two hours, which takes a toll on quality. I may start just dividing the work between a few days, because more complex drawings will be impossible with that kind of schedule.
  8. KiiKrindar

    Sketches galore

    Over one year. To learn drawing like that, I mean. The picture took circa two hours. If you want to draw, just start. MLP Drawing School on reddit has a lot of great tutorials, that's where I started. And I haven't really drawn anything since elementary school, so I had absolutely no practice for, like 11 years (and I would say I had none for 25 years, because elementary school stuff doesn't really count). Try, draw anything, but do it regularly and it will get better. And I'm really glad you like it. There's more on the deviantart, I'll try to post a new piece today if time allows.
  9. KiiKrindar

    My fact is

    Found nothing on ternary computers (will do!), but in the meantime I'll share what I've found this morning. I've already posted that in MD on EQD, so I'll be lazy and just copy myself: In pre WWII Poland there were those things called "Figielki Fotograficzne" , which loosely translates as "Photographic Pranks". Those were small packets of tear-away undeveloped photos. You tear one out, roll and put around cigarette filter. Depending on the kind of material either fumes or temperature developed the photos. Many kinds were sold, but as you can guess most of them were of pornographic nature (although they wouldn't probably even pass as lewd today) and were often confiscated by the police. But thanks to that, we have a lot of them in police magazines and can study how they were made and a lot of effort goes now into preserving them. How awesome is that?
  10. KiiKrindar

    Last to Post: EqD Edition

    I haven't posted JonTron in a while. So I'll post Dan Avidan instead.
  11. KiiKrindar

    Last to Post: EqD Edition

    I'll wait 13 hours and let RougeCookie win. ... Wait a minute...
  12. KiiKrindar

    My fact is

    No idea actually. I need to look more into this, I've only heard legends. In the meantime, have a Polish computer which utilised negabinary (-2) base in computations: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UMC_(computer)
  13. KiiKrindar

    My fact is

    In Soviet Russia bits had three different values, instead of two (thanks to current Morning Discussion on EQD for reminding me that). Soviets even build a computer which run on this principle, instead of the usual machines we have, where the base of operation is a two state on/off bit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Setun
  14. KiiKrindar

    Last to Post: EqD Edition

    Maybe next time.