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I too enjoy to cook.

 

I need to go and make a quesadilla before I starve to death here. I need to do at least that.

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2 minutes ago, AaronMk said:

I too enjoy to cook.

 

I need to go and make a quesadilla before I starve to death here. I need to do at least that.

I just microwave stuff.

 

I know sad...

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Just now, Lord Seraph said:

I just microwave stuff.

 

I know sad...

HOW TO OPERATE OVEN:

 

STEP 1: PUT SKILLET ON BURNER

STEP 2: ACTIVATE RESPECTIVE BURNER

STEP 3: APPLY BUTTER TO PAN AS IT HEATS

STEP 4: APPLY FOOD DIRECTLY TO PAN

 

You are now cooking. With gas or electric, depends on method of destruction.

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Just now, AaronMk said:

HOW TO OPERATE OVEN:

 

STEP 1: PUT SKILLET ON BURNER

STEP 2: ACTIVATE RESPECTIVE BURNER

STEP 3: APPLY BUTTER TO PAN AS IT HEATS

STEP 4: APPLY FOOD DIRECTLY TO PAN

 

You are now cooking. With gas or electric, depends on method of destruction.

My family usually stir fries and braise food.

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Just now, Lord Seraph said:

My family usually stir fries and braise food.

 

Stir frying is pretty easy. Just need a spoon and oil or butter.

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A good, simple recipe I invented at work;

Ingredients-

2 russet or 6 red potatoes, washed and diced

1 table spoon of Cajun seasoning, mesquite meat rub, 1 1/2 table spoon of honey, 1 table spoon of worcestershire sauce, diced red, green, and yellow peppers, and sliced shallots.

Start the veggies, olive oil, and butter in a pan at medium heat. Begin boiling the potatoes in salted water. cook until semi-tender, then add the potatoes, honey, and seasoning to the pan. Cover and fry, stirring occasionally until golden brown. Serve with grilled fish or chicken.

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So I found a pretty good way to microwave steamed buns if you don't have a steamer, considering this is a better food source to live off in college than Ramen. (If you have an Asian Supermarket by you)

 

So you need frozen steamed buns. Delicious, yet awful to eat when they're hard as a rock. You also need a wet paper towel because that is the magic of steaming steamed buns in the microwave. 

 

Put the steamed buns on your dish (make sure it's not plastic, that shit explodes) 

 

Cover steamed buns with wet paper towel and make sure the paper towel is all in the dish. 

 

Depending on how big said steamed bun is, if it is a small steamed bun, microwave for 1 minute. If it's a big steamed bun, microwave for 2 minutes. 

 

Once it's finished microwaving, take off the wet paper towel and now you have delicious steamed buns, smells as if you got them fresh! Just be careful, they are HOT!

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5 hours ago, ChibiDashie said:

So I found a pretty good way to microwave steamed buns if you don't have a steamer, considering this is a better food source to live off in college than Ramen. (If you have an Asian Supermarket by you)

 

So you need frozen steamed buns. Delicious, yet awful to eat when they're hard as a rock. You also need a wet paper towel because that is the magic of steaming steamed buns in the microwave. 

 

Put the steamed buns on your dish (make sure it's not plastic, that shit explodes) 

 

Cover steamed buns with wet paper towel and make sure the paper towel is all in the dish. 

 

Depending on how big said steamed bun is, if it is a small steamed bun, microwave for 1 minute. If it's a big steamed bun, microwave for 2 minutes. 

 

Once it's finished microwaving, take off the wet paper towel and now you have delicious steamed buns, smells as if you got them fresh! Just be careful, they are HOT!

Nice tip!

I might try.

 

Also, frozen dumplings are gifts from the heaven!

Don't dis frozen food! :P

 

 

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I've found Cordon Bleu to be a simple yet lovely recipe. It's very straightforward in terms of preparations: 

Pound some chicken breasts to about a quarter inch.

Sprinkle each side of the meat in salt and ground black pepper

Place one slice of cheese on top, I find Swiss cheese to be ideal but you can use your favorite type, and then a slice of ham on top of that

Fold, or roll, the meat together so that the cheese and ham remain on the inside and jab a toothpick or two in to keep it from unfolding

Sprinkle the meat with some bread crumbs on both sides and chuck it into an already pre-heated oven at 350 F (170 C) for about 35 minutes, depending on the oven. Ideally you want the meat to turn white.

You can pull them out at the 30 minute mark and sprinkle some cheese on top then put them back in the oven for the rest, but that's just some flare I add to mine. 

 

They're best served warm and taste wonderful. Though I wouldn't recommend leaving any in a fridge for too long, chicken meat tends to dry out quite fast. 

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Experience-
I loved cooking and baking growing up.  I'd commonly make cookies and muffins, and liked adding my own ingredients to personalize the recipe.  I added some.... strange..... things to muffins a few times in my tween years.   :roll:  My dad still doesn't trust my cooking and refuses to eat half of what I make.  I'm almost 40.

 

Tip-
I've learned to substitute since my childhood experiments.  And they usually turn out awesome.  For instance, whenever a recipe calls for water, I'll substitute milk, tea, juice, or flavored coffee creamer.  I usually substitute butter for oil.  Powdered butter or chicken flavoring for salt.  Sour cream, yogurt, or ranch dressing for milk.  You just need some cooking common sense, and there's actually a lot you can play with.

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1 minute ago, Skyrazer said:

I've found Cordon Bleu to be a simple yet lovely recipe. It's very straightforward in terms of preparations: 

Pound some chicken breasts to about a quarter inch.

Sprinkle each side of the meat in salt and ground black pepper

Place one slice of cheese on top, I find Swiss cheese to be ideal but you can use your favorite type, and then a slice of ham on top of that

Fold, or roll, the meat together so that the cheese and ham remain on the inside and jab a toothpick or two in to keep it from unfolding

Sprinkle the meat with some bread crumbs on both sides and chuck it into an already pre-heated oven at 350 F (170 C) for about 35 minutes, depending on the oven. Ideally you want the meat to turn white.

You can pull them out at the 30 minute mark and sprinkle some cheese on top then put them back in the oven for the rest, but that's just some flare I add to mine. 

 

They're best served warm and taste wonderful. Though I wouldn't recommend leaving any in a fridge for too long, chicken meat tends to dry out quite fast. 

DUDE!

That's one of my favourite dishes.

Along with the related Chicken Kiev

chicken-kiev.jpg

 

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/chicken-recipes/chicken-kiev/#6YekTyj07yjxZyG0.97

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5 minutes ago, Dublyn Tea said:

Tip-

I've learned to substitute since my childhood experiments.  And they usually turn out awesome.  For instance, whenever a recipe calls for water, I'll substitute milk, tea, juice, or flavored coffee creamer.  I usually substitute butter for oil.  Powdered butter or chicken flavoring for salt.  Sour cream, yogurt, or ranch dressing for milk.  You just need some cooking common sense, and there's actually a lot you can play with.

It's like programing. Except instead of playing with software. You play with edible organic substances!

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Hot Cocoatmeal And Peanut Butter

This is a super-filling, sweet breakfast food for long days where lunch is uncertain.

  1. Heat up some milk. Whole, 2-percent, skim, dry milk in water, whatever. Add a dash of salt.
  2. Begin cooking oats in milk. Follow the recipe on your package of oats. (DO NOT USE INSTANT OATMEAL! Buy a cannister of regular unflavored oats, any style. It's cheaper and better. Remember: Oatmeal doesn't have ingredients. Oatmeal is an ingredient.)
  3. Separately, in a small cup mix 1/2 teaspoon cocoa powder with tiny amounts of hot milk, cream, or water until it forms a runny paste. Continue to dilute mixture with more liquid.
  4. Add cocoa slurry to oats as they're cooking.
  5. When oats have reached your favorite consistency, pour into a bowl. Add way too much Nutella and stir it in.
  6. Top it off with a generous dollop of natural peanut butter in the middle.

 

Why settle for oversugared dry cereal when you can oversugar hot, gooey cereal?

Peanuts, being a legume, pair up with oats to provide a complete protein complex that gives you a healthy balance of amino acids. The milk is its own complete protein source. The sugar in the Nutella, along with the fats in the milk, Nutella, and PB will provide short-term and medium-length food energy respectively. The complete proteins from the oats+PB and milk will provide longer-lasting energy to get you through most of your day. All the fiber in this recipe also helps you feel full and satiated for longer periods of time than a regular bowl of cereal. Sometimes after having this for breakfast I'm tempted to skip lunch!

 

-The kind of oats you use will affect the texture and, more subtly, the taste of the final product. Rolled oats, the most common "oatmeal" in the US, give it a very mushy consistency and a milder flavor. Steel-cut oats, which normally take 20-30 minutes to cook, have a firmer and gummier texture, as well as a slightly nuttier taste. Quick "3-minute" steel-cut oats are more finely chopped. They have a final consistency more like corn grits, and a milder flavor like rolled oats. As far as brands go, there is no difference. Quaker oats taste no better than the store brand that costs half as much, and they probably came from the same fields anyway.

-I add the hot liquid to the cocoa powder to keep it from clumping up into big dry chunks when added to the cooking oats. In my experience, either milk or cream will work better for mixing cocoa slurry than plain water.

-The Nutella is my sweetener here, instead of using sugar. It rounds out the chocolate flavor, adds a bit of its own hazel nuttiness, gives a somewhat smoother mouth feel, and actually provides a bit of its own fiber to the total package. You can mix it in as much as you want. Stirring sparingly will give you stripes of full-strength cocoa oats and super-sweet Nutella oats. Stirring completely and evenly will sweeten the whole bowl.

-I prefer to use natural peanut butter in this recipe, straight from the fridge. It's firmer than regular peanut butter, which actually melts into a runny puddle on top of the hot oats. Plus natural PB has healthier fats and less sugar (you're getting plenty from the Nutella). Personally I don't stir to mix the PB, since it makes the already dense oatmeal even thicker and tends to overpower the chocolate flavor. Instead I just make sure to get a bit of PB in with each spoon of oats.

-For salt I actually use Morton's "Lite" salt, which is about 50/50 sodium chloride (regular salt) and potassium chloride. Most of us could use less sodium and more potassium in our diets! 

 

I'm not going so far as to claim this is good for you, but it should be better for you than a bowl of Lucky Charms. You're getting a lot of nutrition in its native state, rather than as supplementals added to nutrient-poor boxed cereals.

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Made up a burger with chopped radishes and pepperjack cheese, all mixed into the meat. Came out two inches thick. The radishes fried themselves in the  butter and beet fat and they lend a nice texture to the sandwich. Topped it off with barbecue sauce and I'm enjoying it with a bottle of Founders.

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If anyone is on a budget, you can get away with some really cheap homemade food. I always like to buy rice in bulk (10 or 20 kilo bags) because they last long and go well with lots of things. Kidney beans, lentils, and peas are all dirt cheap if bought dry, and last long as well. Combined with some spices, sugar and flour, and you've got yourself a decent variety of dishes already.

 

http://www.supercook.com is an awesome site that will list thousands of recipes you can make, based on the ingredients you input. So you can put every single ingredient and spice in your kitchen, and you're sure to find something.

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Me and the wife had never heard of cucumber sandwiches until watching MLPFiM...over 30 years and I didn't know those were a thing hehe.  Anyway, I had to try them since they are mentioned often in the episodes, so we experimented with a few recipes from the internet.  We kind of mixed and matched some recipes, but here is what we liked after making about a dozen or so of them with different ingredients.  

 

Cucumber Sanwhiches:
MIx together well in a bowl:

- A few ounces of cream cheese

- About 1/6th amount of mayo as the amount of cream cheese

- Small squeeze of mustard

- Small amount of dill - enough to season (We used a dill paste since it lasts longer than fresh and it tastes good)

- Added a few dashes of onion powder, garlic powder, salt, pepper and Worcestershire Sauce (To taste)


Cut up cucumber in thin pieces
Spread the cream cheese spread on white bread

Add cucumber slices

Cut off the crusts and cut bread into mini sandwiches to enjoy

 

I did several measured recipes prior to this, but found that just guessing the amounts and seasoning to taste worked the best, also saved more dishes too =).  I think the most important thing is keeping a solid ratio of cream cheese, mayo, and mustard, and then season to taste.  Cream cheese is the primary ingredient I use for the spread, then less amounts of the rest, but enough to get a good consistency and taste.  So just experiment with what you like.  I've also seen recipes that don't use cream cheese at all or use butter.  I love cream cheese though and can't imagine it any other way.

Definitely will be making these a fair amount this summer.  Pretty tasty, refreshing, and if made in advance are nice to look at in bulk.  Hope you enjoy! 

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If you're on a budget and have plenty of time on your hands, I've found you can get a lot of mileage out of braising a pork shoulder. 

Ingredients

- 1 bone-in pork shoulder (usually between 5-7 pounds)

- Lawry's Seasoned Salt (or other seasoning mix)

- 1 yellow onion, sliced

- 4 cloves garlic

- 1 1/2 cups Coke

- vegetable or olive oil

 

First, preheat an oven to about 325 F. Then, you'll likely need to remove the skin from the shoulder if it's attached. This is actually fairly simple to do, just peel away the skin while slicing just beneath the fat layer with a very sharp knife. After that's removed, trim off any excess bits of fat from the shoulder and rub it liberally with whatever seasoning mix you wish to use. Then, heat up the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat and sear the shoulder on all sides. Once that's done, place the shoulder in a large pan which has been lined with heavy duty tin foil and cover with the onion and garlic. Next, pour the Coke over the shoulder and cover with more foil, making sure to create a good seal over the pan. Then, put the pan in the oven for the next 5 hours or so, until you can take a pair of tongs and tear away pieces of the shoulder with no resistance. Once the shoulder is cooked, remove it from the oven and let it sit for a minute or two. After the meat is cool enough to handle, take a pair of forks and shred it into pieces, removing any remaining pieces of fat or bones.

The meat can be frozen and reheated without any issues and can be used in just about everything from sandwiches to stir frys to enchiladas. 

 

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My favorite recipe to make is fat free cheddar chicken corn chowder. Even though I lost my gallbladder I still didnt lose my love of creamy soups.It has not gone through many variations since my family really loves it.I know it may seem like alot but it's great for leftovers.

Here is my recipe.

2lbs pounds of chicken with skin (I usually chop it up into bite size pieces,skin and debone the chicken breasts then crisp up the skins. Then I  crumble them up and put as a garnish for the finished chowder)
2 cups of chopped onion
2 cups chopped bell pepper

2 cups chopped mushrooms

4 garlic cloves minced

8 1/2 cups of chicken broth (I use  chicken bouillon powder and mix it with water)
3 1/2 cups chopped and peeled red potatoes
4 1/2 cups of frozen veggies (using the ones that have corn and carrots are the best for this recipe)
1 cup all purpose flour
4 cups fat free half and half
1 1/2 cups of fat free shredded cheddar
1 tsp of salt
1/2 tsp pepper
(optional ingredients)
few tablespoons of fat free cream cheese it does make the chowder a bit creamier
a tablespoon or two of fat free sour cream adds creaminess but a nice bite to it as well
a few pinches of nutmeg it compliments the flavor of the chowder

Now for the directions

  1. Add the chicken, onion, bell pepper ,garlic and mushrooms to the pan; saute for 5 minutes. Add broth and potato and bring to a boil. Cover and reduce heat. Simmer for 20 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Before adding the frozen vegetables be sure to cook it in the microwave since it does add unneeded moisture to the soup making the flour not thicken as well as it should then add it in: stir well.
  2. Lightly spoon flour into a dry measuring cup, and level with a knife. Place flour in a bowl. Gradually add fat free half and half, stirring with a whisk until blended; add to the soup. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for 15 minutes or until thick, stirring frequently. Stir in the cheddar cheese, salt and pepper. Top with crumbled chicken skins. ( I know it sounds weird but its actually pretty darn tasty)

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