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VGmaster9

Has tradtional pencil/paper animation become obsolete?

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With digital software coming about, both for 2d and 3d, do you think there would be no need for traditional animation now that we have technology to use for the animation? Yes it is expensive and time consuming, but it has left fantastic results.

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It is a bit rare these days, but I don't think it'll go out of style. There are just some things that can't be expressed solely with technology.

 

Some artists/animators can't think, experiment, or create using just digital software.

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Animations is not something that we "need" but rather something we want, and we want it because we like it. Therefore there will be hand-drawn animation for as long as there's people who like it.

Oil painting didn't disappear when photographs were invented.

Newspapers didn't disappear when the radio was invented.

Television didn't killed cinema.

Horses didn't become extinct because of cars.

It's a false dilemma.

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I don't think purely traditional animation has been a thing for quite some time now. Not since Disney animations and Japanese studios moved on to digital work. I mean, there's always a traditional aspect of creating animations. Concept phases often include hand-drawn pieces and story boarding is all done by hand, albeit now it's almost always digitally. 

The problems with traditional pencil & paper animation is the lack of efficiency, sure you need to invest in the software to do things digitally but the process becomes a lot easier and faster. Why spend the time making traditional work when you can get something of equal or better quality via the use of digital tools like 2d and 3d digital animation.

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2 hours ago, Skyrazer said:

I don't think purely traditional animation has been a thing for quite some time now. Not since Disney animations and Japanese studios moved on to digital work. I mean, there's always a traditional aspect of creating animations. Concept phases often include hand-drawn pieces and story boarding is all done by hand, albeit now it's almost always digitally. 

The problems with traditional pencil & paper animation is the lack of efficiency, sure you need to invest in the software to do things digitally but the process becomes a lot easier and faster. Why spend the time making traditional work when you can get something of equal or better quality via the use of digital tools like 2d and 3d digital animation.

Though I'll admit, the program TVPaint is pretty much the digital version of traditional hand drawn animation. Surprised it hasn't been made for movies yet.

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Usually I'm the guy who advocates for new stuff being better, but in this case I think that there is a quality in frame-by-frame animation (let's not limit it to pencil and paper) which is not present in vector and puppet based animation. I say that as someone who is almost completely unfamiliar with the field of animation. However, I also think that there's an argument to be made for the much greater efficiency of software animation. With it we cartoon-consumers can have a lot more quantity for only slightly less quality.

 

But maybe I'm confusing movie-quality drawn animation with TV quality vector animation. If I had to choose between Hannah-Barbara animation and Flash animation, I'd choose Flash. If it were between Flash and Tom-and-Jerry, style, I'd go with Tom-and-Jerry. Flash vs. early-2000s PPG-style.... I don't know. Of course, newer animation software is kinda throwing a wrench into this comparison, and 3d animation is it's own thing. Some things look better flat. MLP definitely should NEVER be made 3D, but Inside Out would have looked much worse if it were traditionally animated.

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Well, I think between the closest frame for frame drawn animations you can find today is the category we call Anime here in the western world. Japanese people do stick to tradition with the frame for frame drawn animations despite not being handdrawn like sailor moon was. Even though it is digital do they draw frame for frame and not piece for piece like we do here in the western world. We all know that MLP is a piece for piece animation and not frame for frame - sounds stupid but you can always change the pieces in the animation of MLP where in anime if you fuck up you just ruined whole the anime - so even though that traditional animation isn't long most used anymore does those handdrawn animations still exist and they are very popularly even. 

 

The animation is one of the important tools for which story you want to represent. 

 

Example - if "Hasbro" any day would come and tell me my fanfiction should be animated would I demand a longer and more expensive process for the higher quality there in the end would often create more viewers. I have hardly enjoyed there piece for piece animations :/ so poorly made.

Of cause my love for the traditional drawn backgrounds in anime and the way anime works also influenced a lot of my opinion towards 2D animation. 

As a comic artist, freelancer and author I can't really give my full opinion on animation but I find the animations where you can see the company means serious business as a facinating fact. Hasbro just want to sell toys. More characters = more toys.

 

Anyway, to just end this of. Many animes show serious business cases, Here between Yuri on Ice, Gangsta, partly Death parade (they used some 3d here and there)

where the cheaper animes like Uta No Prince Sama and The Heroic legend of Arslan Senki has been really depending on 3D animation to make the budget cheaper and the animation easier. Uta no prince sama uses though high quality 80-90% of the time and Arslan Senki on maybe 50% of the time. (For arslan senki: Flags, souldiers, water and ships are 3D animation, really sucks, but the storyline is actually quite good and there is some scenes here and there, there is amazing!)

 

Anyway, sure that traditional 2D animation still exist, but some of the last use of it there got slightly populary must have been... Balto? It used some traditional animation as far as I know. I think though they shifted between digital and traditional but don't bite me sure in it- But else we need to go all the way back to Disney's The Little Mermaid, there even had a "was stuck in process" where bobbles was stuck in china - They wanted cheap labor and that went them to be lated with was it 3 weeks or 3 months??? IDK.

 

So basically the handdrawn animations still exist. lol.

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On 09/11/2016 at 1:36 AM, VGmaster9 said:

With digital software coming about, both for 2d and 3d, do you think there would be no need for traditional animation now that we have technology to use for the animation? Yes it is expensive and time consuming, but it has left fantastic results.

Obsolete no, hard to pitch to a network executive, yes.

A lot of cartoons these days are consist of two stages. "Key Frame" and "Inbtween".

Key Frames are drawn by professional animators and represent the most critical postures and movements that a character makes.

Inbetween Frames are the moments in between the key frames where the character moves from one to the next.

In computer animation a lot of these frames can be managed by the software. In traditional animation they are often farmed out to animation factories in places like Korea where dozens of semi-professional do the laborious parts. This makes them much more expensive to do.

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