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Games that haven't aged well.

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What are some games that were great for their time, or that you loved as a kid, but have aged poorly?

 

For me, it's Stunt Race FX for SNES. Look at that frame rate: 

 

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My concept of aging poorly is generally developer oversight and technical stuff. Many of the games that suffer from aging are already past the point where one can really comment on their graphics or gameplay in comparison to new titles.

Fallout 3 and New Vegas are two perfect examples. Both provide no support for 64-bit OS'es and anything anything higher than Windows XP. Both games are riddled with strange glitches and crashes that happen on newer hardware and require patches and mods to fix.

The classic strategy games like Age of Empires, Empire Earth, Cossaks have all aged poorly and experience technical difficulties on new systems and have no support for 16:9. 

Evil Genius, one of my favorite base-builder strategy games back in the day, also aged rather poorly. A lacking support for widescreen displays, driver issues on new cards and necessary fixes having to be provided by directing editing values in the game's executable. It's still a brilliant game with a wonderful art style, gameplay, mechanics and as far as I'm aware it's still one of a kind in it's genre. 

Freelancer, also a favorite of mine, was one of the best Space Sims in the early 2000's, but it's still aged rather poorly. It suffers from a number of things like lack of Vsync, poorly scaling UI, no resolution support above 4:3, framerate related glitches during cutscenes, etc.. A substantial modding community still runs servers and mods that deal with almost all the problems the original game has developed over time however. It's rather impressive to watch a game continue living now on mods for 10 years now.

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1 hour ago, Skyrazer said:

My concept of aging poorly is generally developer oversight and technical stuff. Many of the games that suffer from aging are already past the point where one can really comment on their graphics or gameplay in comparison to new titles.

Fallout 3 and New Vegas are two perfect examples. Both provide no support for 64-bit OS'es and anything anything higher than Windows XP. Both games are riddled with strange glitches and crashes that happen on newer hardware and require patches and mods to fix.

The classic strategy games like Age of Empires, Empire Earth, Cossaks have all aged poorly and experience technical difficulties on new systems and have no support for 16:9. 

Evil Genius, one of my favorite base-builder strategy games back in the day, also aged rather poorly. A lacking support for widescreen displays, driver issues on new cards and necessary fixes having to be provided by directing editing values in the game's executable. It's still a brilliant game with a wonderful art style, gameplay, mechanics and as far as I'm aware it's still one of a kind in it's genre. 

Freelancer, also a favorite of mine, was one of the best Space Sims in the early 2000's, but it's still aged rather poorly. It suffers from a number of things like lack of Vsync, poorly scaling UI, no resolution support above 4:3, framerate related glitches during cutscenes, etc.. A substantial modding community still runs servers and mods that deal with almost all the problems the original game has developed over time however. It's rather impressive to watch a game continue living now on mods for 10 years now.

Crysis also falls into this category. You need to download a special third party executable in order to make it run. This is aside from the fact whoever decided that the sprint meter and the suit energy meter needed to be the same thing needs to be knee-capped. 

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