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Am I the only person on this planet who liked Newbie Dash?

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As what the title says: "Am I the only person on this planet who liked Newbie Dash?" 

 

Newbie Dash is considered to be one of the worst episodes of Season Six. And I know that I am going to get a lot of flak for saying this but: I liked it. 

 

Sure the part where RD impersonates the Mane Six is not the best part and I kind of liked that part to a point. But not that much. 

 

I liked the ending though. 

 

But please don't hate me for liking something that everyone dislikes. Like Mei from Overwatch.

 

 

 

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I personally dislike the episode and I think it's one of the worst episodes in season 6, but I get what you mean. Even though I hated it, the beginning and ending were solid. Honestly, the episode just went downhill right when Dash started doing the impressions imo

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And I haven't even seen it! :hithere:

That puts me in a wonderful state of Superposition where I neither like nor dislike the episode until it is observed! It's science fascinating?

 

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The impressions were cringe but that's kinda the point. I'm always able to find a reason to like an episode of MLP, which is not to say that they are exempt from criticism.

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I liked Newbie Dash too. And I loved the impressions sequence. I thought it was one of the funniest things the show has ever done. (And I'm normally not that big on cringe humor.)

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No, you're not! It wasn't one of my favorites from the season but I did enjoy it.

In fact, I can probably count on one hand the number of episodes in the entire series that didn't do anything for me, or that hit enough of the wrong buttons for me to actively dislike it, which puts me at odds with a lot of other fans sometimes.

It's weird for me to see people post their pained, offended, or huffy commentaries where they list all the reasons why X episode or Y writer is the WORST. POSSIBLE. THING! A lot of times I see them diverging wildly from either events that actually happened in the episode or pulling up some minor fault and driving off on a tangent about this perceived failing with the pedal to the metal in their GRRR-mobile. Sometimes I'm just sitting there reading these things and thinking, "... please show the court on the doll where the pony touched you." Sometimes they have a legitimate criticism about the mechanics of an episode or the portrayal of a character, a lot of times they seem to be both selective in their memory and exquisitely sensitive to contradicting their own internal, privileged frame of reference for the show and how it "should" be. In most cases I find them to be overreacting either way.

I get that a lot of people get emotionally invested in this show. I'm one of them, after all! I've been riding this train nonstop for almost six years now. I've seen the Horse Famous rise and fall, before "horse fame" was even a phrase. I've watched entire amateur media empires grow from a tiny pod, cast into the seas of rich fandom, calcify into mighty reefs of vibrant content ecosystems, seeming to be a network forever free, and then weaken, collapsing at last under the whisper of a final draft. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhorser Gate... well, you get the picture. 

The point is, I enjoy the show enough to stick around through all that. Am I doing something differently than the ones who get worked up over a particular episode? Could be. I enjoy the show for what it is, not what I want it to be. Do I turn off my critical thinking cap when the cold open starts? Absolutely not. But I don't sit down and watch the show first as critic and only distantly second as a casual viewer. My goal is to watch these adorably rendered characters play off each other in cute, silly, and occasionally inspiring ways. That's what I get out of this show, and why I keep coming back to it. I realize that a TV series that is designed to appeal to the 5-12 crowd is not going to reach the intricate web of complexity and depth of Tolkien's legendarium.

I also realize that kids, the actual target audience, are not going to be poring over every word in every episode to find faults or contradictions that will ruin their enjoyment of the show or unintentionally give them a broken Aesop about how the Mane 6 actually solved a problem by being terrible to each other. When you think about the episodes critically, you shouldn't just consider a sequence of events in a continuity by itself. To be a genuine critic, you have to bring in the meta-narratives, the limitations of medium, and the literary techniques being employed. Without looking at the whole picture your criticism is going to be lopsided and unfair.

For example, two particular Dash episodes are often derided in the fandom for portraying the solution to Dash's problem with deception and trickery. I'm talking of course about The Mysterious Mare-Do-Well and 28 Pranks Later. It's been said by many that this gives kids the wrong message. I'm convinced by my own experiences that this criticism is misguided.

Older audiences often don't see media the same way that kids do, because they have a different set of context and multiple kid-lifetimes of baggage and experiences behind their reaction that the kids don't have and can't use to inform their opinion. I've been aware of this divide since I was 9 years old, watching an episode of Batman TAS and my father became upset with the way it portrayed Batman's grief after Commissioner Gordon was shot. It wasn't the fact that the episode depicted violence that upset my father, but the fact that he didn't think Batman was reacting appropriately in the aftermath. To me, seeing Batman react so badly was a powerful message about people and our faults. It wasn't a scene that encouraged me to react just as badly when, two years later, something tragic happened to a person I cared about. It did not influence me to be a worse person. If anything, seeing an adult figure with character flaws and imperfections actually made me more empathetic and contributed in its tiny way to my budding understanding of how to interact with other people on their own level rather than just mine.

Relating this back to the two Dash vs. Mane 6 episodes, I think a lot of people who take issue with these solutions are missing how a child watching the show would experience things. Most kids would probably be right there with Dash as she played up her amazing heroism or doubled down on her increasingly elaborate and line-crossing pranks, at least at first. But both episodes spent a lot of time focusing on how Dash reacted when the tables were turned. The audience got an extended exposure to how badly she felt when someone more heroic upstaged her, or when she herself was the victim of a prank that went "too far" for her to enjoy being on the receiving end of it. That's what a kid is going to take away from these kinds of episodes, because kids more naturally fall into the protagonist's perspective of whatever they're watching. If you have managed to get the far into my text wall, please respond with the word Orange.

If Dash is the protagonist and she's doing legitimately heroic things or pulling pranks that, let's admit it, are pretty damn hilarious as long as you don't consider being the victim, kids are going to identify with that right up until they get a lesson in why they shouldn't. In both cases, once the tables turned Dash's emotions were on exaggerated display to drive the point home without subtly that endless bragging can make someone else feel bad, or that a joke you thought was funny can seriously upset someone. The lesson would be lessened if we didn't get to experience these things as Dash herself and were only told about it by a different character. Just as Dash did not pick up the hints about her bragging or pranking despite being told repeatedly why they were upsetting the other characters... until she lived through their side of things for a change. The point is to have the character get the perspective they've been missing, and the audience will typically absorb the same lesson if they're not letting their own baggage stand in the way.

That's one of the things that separates a child from a teenager or adult when it comes to consuming media. It's why shows like MLP can get away with a premise that includes an "obvious" problem with an "obvious" solution that never winds up being employed until the climax has been reached and the show is in the resolution phase of storytelling. Could the whole episode have been condensed to two minutes if X character had done Y thing from the start? Yes, but that's exactly what the show is trying to teach the audience. A lot of brony critics say "this episode didn't need to happen because X could have been solved if they'd just done Y in like two minutes," and that's how you know someone has fundamentally missed the entire point of a show designed to teach lessons to young children.

What bothers me most about this is my concern that other people making a similar mistake will uncritically echo the sentiments they see online and amplify the signal until it fills up that infamous Tumblr/Twitter echo chamber and becomes firmly entrenched in the fandom's collective consciousness about the show. This is how we get a kind of "conventional wisdom" that all Spike episodes suck, certain writers are terrible, or the series was ruined by [character] because the audience wants a different direction. There doesn't seem to be a lot of genuine argument or back-and-forth on some of these pieces of "conventional wisdom," few obstacles to blunt the echoes and prevent what could be misguided or outright malicious sentiments from taking root everywhere. I believe that if more people took a step back and examined why they react the way they do and whether or not they could be mistaken in their assessment, we'd have more healthy, informed, and productive criticism. At the very least I think few people are doing enough to take in more perspectives than their own. After all, the easiest person to fool is yourself.

 

TL,DR; a lot of people need to either lighten the buck up or think even harder when it comes to watching the show.

 

1150195__safe_solo_rainbow+dash_screenca

 

 

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Though Newbie Dash is not without its flaws, I appreciate it very much. I have been a pretty sensitive person throughout my childhood, and I hated it when people makes jokes about me. To a limited extent, I still struggle with sensitivity, but this episode has been a nice reminder to me of something I learned in life through school and work.  

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Nope, I didn't care for that episode. It's almost as bad as Pinkie Pride was, but at least Newbie Dash is a notch better.

The impersonation part was very off putting, but hey, at least in it's defense, I can attempt to watch the episode, while with Pinkie Pride, I just skip it outright and go straight from Three's a Crowd to Simple Ways.

It's also kind of letdown that the episode uses the "Rainbow Crash" thing, when it's been already done plenty of times in the previous seasons, dating all the way back to season 1, which makes it feel very unoriginal, and it gets kind of grating after a while.

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44 minutes ago, Silver Rain said:

Nope, I didn't care for that episode. It's almost as bad as Pinkie Pride was, but at least Newbie Dash is a notch better.

The impersonation part was very off putting, but hey, at least in it's defense, I can attempt to watch the episode, while with Pinkie Pride, I just skip it outright and go straight from Three's a Crowd to Simple Ways.

It's also kind of letdown that the episode uses the "Rainbow Crash" thing, when it's been already done plenty of times in the previous seasons, dating all the way back to season 1, which makes it feel very unoriginal, and it gets kind of grating after a while.

Man, I loved Pinkie Pride. :c

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I loved Pinkie Pride too. I think that was my favorite normal episode of the season, and I'm not even a huge Pinkie Pie fan. (I like her, but she's not my favorite.)

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I liked it your not alone, but I do see what other people are saying and they are right. I can see the other side and agree but it didn't stop me from liking it

I wont go into detail as ABronyAccount is on point, also I'm always late to share my opinions anyway. over all,  not that bad as they say /10

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2 hours ago, Friendship is Horses said:

There is an alternate universe where Dash's Fluttershy impression really struck a chord with the other Wonderbolts, and then she had to keep acting like that until she had a stress meltdown from suppressing her ego so much.

Okay? Anyone can make an AU; that's what fanfiction is. Not to say that isn't an interesting concept, but what input if any do you have on this topic?

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23 hours ago, ultimateAI said:

Okay? Anyone can make an AU; that's what fanfiction is. Not to say that isn't an interesting concept, but what input if any do you have on this topic?

Just pointing out how half-baked her fitting-in strategy was. If we're specifically talking about whether or not I liked Newbie Dash... It was all right. 3/5 stars. Dashie dog sounds were nice touch. Friend impressions cringe. Holy shit, Dash, Scootaloo could have died if she missed that cloud, what were you thinking? Show-spanning story arc resolved, landmark episode, could've been better.

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Just now, Friendship is Horses said:

Just pointing out how half-baked her fitting-in strategy was. If we're specifically talking about whether or not I liked Newbie Dash... It was all right. 3/5 stars. Dashie dog sounds were nice touch. Friend impressions cringe. Holy shit, Dash, Scootaloo could have died if she missed that cloud, what were you thinking? Show-spanning story arc resolved, landmark episode, could've been better.

Yeah, I can get down with that. Regarding the AU though, I actually think that is more half-baked than what actually happened simply because her impression striking a cord with the others just doesn't seem believable at all. It sounds forced. At least her impressions got the kind of reaction to be expected.

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2 minutes ago, ultimateAI said:

Yeah, I can get down with that. Regarding the AU though, I actually think that is more half-baked than what actually happened simply because her impression striking a cord with the others just doesn't seem believable at all. It sounds forced. At least her impressions got the kind of reaction to be expected.

Ah, but suppose the rest of the Wonderbolts figured out what she was trying to do, and Spitfire sort of wink-nudge-follow-my-lead went along with it, just to see how long they could get Dash to stay in character as a doormat.

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