Crecious

Critiques Requested~

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Hey all. So I just finished a pretty big commission. I'm really happy with it, but as always I know things can be improved. Is there anything you guys can see that I need to work on? 

 

what_adventures_await__commission__by_cr

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It looks good! I like that you're not afraid to go dark in some areas, and I love the dynamism of the clouds and the vegetation. It's bold! Dramatic! The mountains feel a little... close, however. As much as I like how they're stylized, you might experiment with adding more subtle detail to them to make it look like there's a mountain's worth of far-away stuff on their surface. And the rock that Scootaloo(?) is standing on looks rather smooth. Every element seems very much separated from the others. I'm not a good enough artist to give you any real, in-depth suggestions, sorry. In terms of general composition and communicating an emotion, though, this is excellent. I like the watercolor-looking effect on the clouds.

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It is a very dramatic scene, I will give it that. But it's severely lacking in some very big areas.

 

Visually the piece feels unbalanced. The poner should be the center of, and immediate source of the viewer's attention but I found myself looking at the mountains first rather than the subject itself. This is made worse in that the piece uses the most saturated colors on the palette, or it feels that way. In black and white the piece is better, but we can go deeper.

 

There's an abundance of black in this image which suggests that the light itself should be going nuclear, but the sky itself is clear. That said, I doubt what you were going for is a scene with a nuclear detonation in the background, or to imply it's in space or in a cave and the subject is looking out of the opening. I bring this up because: light reflects. Go outside during the afternoon, shadows are hardly straight black or the most harshest black available. They cast a softer darkening. Light also has color of its own which can effect the temperature of the scene but that's not really important unless you're doing early-morning, late-evening, or scenes inside where light bulbs can change the color temperature (green, yellow, or orange commonly). You just don't notice this very much because your eyes adjust to make white white.

 

Moving ahead, things I would recommend you do: adjust the color saturation of the background and wash it out, both in color intensity and depth of tones. Mountains that far away should never be that dark unless they're blocking the sunset. In most cases, they should be very, very pale against the distance. This is called atmospheric haze. As seen:

 

mountains_in_the_distance_by_kaikaku-d95

 

Here's a Photoshop tutorial on the subject too, principally for photography and how to remove the haze to make objects further away seem closer; but the essence still applies. Your mountains should probably be lacking a lot more contrast than they do and detail work. Really, you can get away with them being just solid fuzzy-edged shapes at the end of the day, but so long as they're in low contrast to the sky behind them then it's good.

 

The other major deal setting this back is its color. Not only is the entire image far too saturated, but there isn't any, well, coherency. There are rules to color use, and I think before I move ahead I should post a video tutorial to get the point across and avoid writing an essay on the subject.

 

 

Now that's done, I'm going to refer to my favorite color swatch tool, Adobe Color.

 

Assuming the background blue is the primary color

 

Assuming this, then tossing the color of the character in the scene in that nice orange-yellow/BROWN range sets it off very well in the image, and I would in fact suggest that if the mountains themselves were removed then he/she'd stand out very well. But then this comes into a value argument, so I'll save this for later.

 

You can also change the pallet to the triadic format for more color range to consider.

 

And this is assuming we're going to use the OC's color as the piece's primary color of focus

 

This gives an interesting color set up for a night-time scene with a primarily purple night sky. You would need to adjust the entire image though with the inclusion of a light-source between us, the viewer and the pony, or between us. Like a camp-fire to provide value contrast.

 

Next: value. As I said before about the mountains being so dark against the distance and the depth of the shadows. All the black is pretty ubiquitous throughout the image and it flattens it without it ever highlighting any one thing. On the histogram the general trend in color value is pretty level throughout the whole thing, maxing out in the deep shadows. While having pitch-black isn't a bad thing, it isn't a good one either. But putting it simply you could get some balance with values simply by nuking all the blacks and soften it for the foliage and pulling the mountains in particular deep into the highlight range.

 

Tackling color and value is why I like to set up first a 'shading' layer first which is where I set up the shadows and address just the color of light.

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9 hours ago, AaronMk said:

It is a very dramatic scene, I will give it that. But it's severely lacking in some very big areas.

 

 

 

Thank you so much for your information, after reading it over I feel that you're absolutely right. I will be working on composing my art more in line with complimentary colors and making it more appealing on the eyes. 

 

That site you sent, the Color Wheel, I've been looking for something like that for a long time! thank you for sending that! 

 

I'll be posting more future pieces and I hope I improve soon :)

 

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M8 you need to start focus you view.
Take focus to middle of the picture or mabye on background.
Now picture is great but it feel no clear  or definition, you shoud do pony on the middle is more definition or do more contrast.
Picture shoud have a object/thing that take most of viewer attention, now i look to all picture/ not to the object.
Sorry for bad eng. ;D
i may be not correct.

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