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Friendship is Horses

Do You Like Your Job?

Do You Like Your Job?  

18 members have voted

  1. 1. Do You Like Your Job?

    • Yes, generally
      9
    • It sucks, if I had any practical alternative I'd walk backwards out the door with both middle fingers extended
      3
    • Eh, it puts bread on the table/onions in the soup
      2
    • I live in my parents' basement
      0
    • I go to school/college, my dreams haven't been crushed yet
      4


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I checked yes. I did a lot of short jobs that I hated before (parking tollbooth, salesman, grape picker, cashier, electrician). My co-workers and boss was generally pretty cool and I tried not showing that I didn't like to work, but I was sad.

I love programming, especially into web, but I knew I didn't want to work on it in a company. I did during my studies, and all that we do is configuring/setting frameworks and CMS who mainly code for you. This way we earn so much time, but I found no interest by working like that.

That's why I tried to start my own business in web development by creating my own tools. After 2 years, I earned enough money to leave my electrician job. It's 2 years I work for myself with my own tools, and I LOVE IT SO MUCH !

Of course I have difficulties and stress sometimes, and I'm pretty poor now, but in my mind, I would rather live like that, because I'm not sad to wake up on the morning (morning, afretnoon, or night btw). And maybe I'll be a rich person after 15 years developing ? Who knows ? :cloppa:

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Well generally I don't hate my job, but I'm not entirely neutral on it. It may be eight hours of picking boxes up and putting them down but I'm not entirely dead over it. I'm also slowly going through college on a part-time basis, while my faith in the present model of things moving ahead is slim I still got personal hope I can get out of the trap that is my personal situation.

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I work at a call center as a remote help desk tech.  Not the best job in the world, but I love that I get to be home everyday to spend time with family.  Also, 3rd shift is awesome since I get to pretty much manage myself.  I think I enjoy it more than I normally would since I spent time in the military, which was hard on the wife and kids.  That made me pretty much appreciate anything I could get that let me spend more time with them, so ultimately I like my job.  If it is a quiet night at work, I can always watch some MLP too =P, so absolutely nothing bad with that hehe.

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I kinda work at school as a part of a school program to get experience for my resumé. It's decent, as I'm pretty much serving lunch. Unfortunately, there's a few bad apples that aren't very um...productive. Said people would just stand around and do nothing and somehow not get in trouble.

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I'm still a high schooler, so I don't know what it'll be like in the future, but I LOVE my lead programmer job on my robotics team. Programming a robot in 6 weeks with only one week to test isn't easy, but it's fun! Plus, I get the bonuses of free pizza and soda, space from my parents, plenty of time to goof off with the other weirdos (they were the first to know I watched MLP for a reason), and the occasional sneaked MLP break with my furry coprogrammer.

 

And to think, I only have to pay $250 a year to see our robot do this:

youtu.be/91bx6HvIlVY

Ours is the blue robot that falls

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I like my work. It's satisfying and challenges me, mentally and physically. Much of it is outdoors, sometimes in really great scenery. Last week I did some work at a winery in the mountains, for example.

The stuff that goes on around my work which makes it an actual job is kind of stressful and full of BS.

 

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yes I love my job.

We are always busy but I'm okay with it and I'm still have lot  to learn even I'm already educated as IT supporter. Always new tech stuff and technology

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I wouldn't say love, but it is quite nice that I like it enough to stay. my schedule may range between 9 to 14 hours of work hours at a time throughout the week, but since I get paid by the hour thats actually a lot. Movie Projectionist is pretty casual. Coming into work I'd tell the projectors "good morning~!" (turning them all on), then I would give them all their work list for the day (putting in some commands for them to automatically run the movies, WHEN they're supposed to run the movies), and then all that's left for me to do is sit around, and only look after the temperature of the air conditioners and turn on/off the lights in the Halls when the movie ends/haven't started and people are coming in.So generally Its pretty laid back moments during those times when all the movies are running and all the Halls are dark, just doing nothing but playing Fallout Shelter and Mobile Legends on my phone...

 

Wish I'd get a better boss though, he's been known to fire people just because he didn't like them for that one time they forgot to punch their card, or the time they had an accident but he didn't believe it so he fires them. Always gotta stick on his good side. OHW9I3s.png

 

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My job's pretty new (4 weeks and counting), so I don't quite know how I feel about it yet. It's part of the reason why I wanted to know about the rest of y'all's work and how it's treating you. There are parts I like -- three-day weekends, affable co-workers, free lunches -- and parts that I don't: "ten-hour" shifts that usually run longer, a mix of grueling physical work and long stretches of tedium, frequent scrapes and bruises from a combination of the necessary fast pace and all the slamming and opening of various doors and hatches. I'm part of a team that collects and counts cash from slot machines at a casino. In the morning we cart a bunch of empty canisters to one of the three rotating zones and set them all out, then quickly move in a line through about 800 machines, unlocking outer and inner doors, collecting all the full canisters, shoving the empty ones in and re-locking the machines. Then for the next 6-8 hours we unlock canisters, run money through counting machines, verify it, bag it and count it. It's murder on the back and hands, and there are no chairs in the count room because anything and everything extraneous is a security liability, and as the like twenty cameras on the ceiling attest, the house doesn't exactly trust us with their money. At the end of the day, my feet are killing me, and the last hour is standing around in a locked, empty room with nothing to do while the totals export to accounting for them to check everything over. The collecting part is taxing, and the counting part requires just enough presence of mind that you can't daydream without making trivial mistakes that take forty-five minutes to sort out (there's no "close enough" in the count room; if your count is at all different from the machine you better find where that money went, even if it's just a five-dollar bill that ended up falling under a table), but it's not super stimulating, either.

Maybe it's Millenial Entitlement or whatever, but I'd sorta rather be doing something else. A spotty work history and lack of a college degree don't give me a lot of options, though, so maybe I should be grateful for what I've got.

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Factory work is very similar to that. 10-hour shifts are the norm, and there is often a mandatory 5th day (so yay, overtime but boo, guaranteed 50 hours at work). It's also tedious, repetitive, physically demanding, and not intellectually stimulating. You also have to account for every part and every piece of materiel, though usually not with 20 cameras on you.

Despite what some people think, manufacturing just isn't an engine of the middle class anymore either. The pay is low, the benefits are nearly nonexistant if you don't live in the upper-midwest where unions are a thing. You come into the job as a temp worker, and years later you can still leave as a temp worker rather than as an actual employee of the factory. Almost all of the people I used to work with in factories were also not middle income, and not on a path to becoming middle income. Heck, half of them were old ladies who needed the money despite being past retirement age.

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I went from working 3 retail jobs, one which I have been working at for 4 years to a permanent full time job as a rural services officer 4 months after graduating senior and it has been the best thing ever. It was awfully hard work wise because the only main industries were the mines and apprenterships (which were few and far between) and they were in quite a big downturn at the time . And a lot of businesses were putting off their workers because of this. I may have had to travel for this job but I'm extremely lucky that I got the opportunity.

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On 5/27/2017 at 7:42 AM, Hamie10 said:

I went from working 3 retail jobs, one which I have been working at for 4 years to a permanent full time job as a rural services officer 4 months after graduating senior and it has been the best thing ever. It was awfully hard work wise because the only main industries were the mines and apprenterships (which were few and far between) and they were in quite a big downturn at the time . And a lot of businesses were putting off their workers because of this. I may have had to travel for this job but I'm extremely lucky that I got the opportunity.

I can see how a guy that loves to be outdoors would enjoy being an RSO.

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14 hours ago, ABronyAccount said:

I can see how a guy that loves to be outdoors would enjoy being an RSO.

Yeah I'm loving it, but I'm still going to peruse my original career of aircraft technician then later, pilot 

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On 5/9/2017 at 0:07 PM, ABronyAccount said:

Factory work is very similar to that. 10-hour shifts are the norm, and there is often a mandatory 5th day (so yay, overtime but boo, guaranteed 50 hours at work). It's also tedious, repetitive, physically demanding, and not intellectually stimulating. You also have to account for every part and every piece of materiel, though usually not with 20 cameras on you.

Despite what some people think, manufacturing just isn't an engine of the middle class anymore either. The pay is low, the benefits are nearly nonexistant if you don't live in the upper-midwest where unions are a thing. You come into the job as a temp worker, and years later you can still leave as a temp worker rather than as an actual employee of the factory. Almost all of the people I used to work with in factories were also not middle income, and not on a path to becoming middle income. Heck, half of them were old ladies who needed the money despite being past retirement age.

 

I'm coming back to this thread to make a reprisal on my earlier post, and quoting this to make my point a response to this seems appropriate.

 

I recently issued a new wave of applications to try and find a new job, one that'll pay higher so I can try to move up in my life. PepsiCo had offerings in its nearby manufacturing and distribution center so I threw an application that way to see what I can get. Or namely I put an app in for a warehouse loader. I got an interview in and going through those motions I realized something I didn't realize I needed or wanted.

 

Flexibility.

 

Sure, working in this position at over sixteen-dollars an hour at a union protected position would be nice to establish some independence. But the position was rotating shift with no offered flexibility and I realized at that moment that getting into something like this would be me basically shelving my future plans.

 

It's the sort of thing where poor rate aside at my present job has more-or-less forced me to reanalyze my work and I've come to the conclusion that though I'm kicking it in retail, the company - Home Depot - and my bosses are very generous in giving me control of my work schedule.

 

Needless to say I was a bit relieved when I got the Email that PepsiCo found someone better for the position so I have a legitimatized excuse as to why I'm not there.

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@AaronMk What are your future plans, if I may ask? I've been trying to make some of my own. So far...

1. Get better at drawing

2. ???????

3. Be making enough money to quit day job

Although, the day job's going better nowadays. I'm generally working five days a week now because we're short-staffed, but activity at the casino has settled down somewhat since the expansion, and I got on a shift schedule with less weekend money to count so I'm actually getting out of work on time more often than not. I bought some comfier shoes and my body's gotten used to the daily abuse of the key-turning parade. It's nice to work a job where you've got a task to complete and then you can go home, as opposed to being tethered to a location for an arbitrary length of time.

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16 hours ago, Friendship is Horses said:

@AaronMk What are your future plans, if I may ask? I've been trying to make some of my own. So far...

1. Get better at drawing

2. ???????

3. Be making enough money to quit day job

Although, the day job's going better nowadays. I'm generally working five days a week now because we're short-staffed, but activity at the casino has settled down somewhat since the expansion, and I got on a shift schedule with less weekend money to count so I'm actually getting out of work on time more often than not. I bought some comfier shoes and my body's gotten used to the daily abuse of the key-turning parade. It's nice to work a job where you've got a task to complete and then you can go home, as opposed to being tethered to a location for an arbitrary length of time.

Get into design for advertisement and fuck around making ads all day.

 

Folk won't hire you if you don't have a degree to flash.

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I don't really mind my job as a rule, but anything that I have to do, as opposed to going swimming, shopping or hanging with my besties, is sucky. Therefore, I wouldn't shed a tear if I won the lotto and left the present daytime grind in the dust. 

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