Badshot

Building a computer. But there's so many options...

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I have money together to build a computer straight from scratch. Well most of it, but I will.

 

I got the case, an Ultra Defender 2 that my dad got from a warehouse that was throwing some out because they had some defects (the one he grabbed has a small crack on the top.)

Thing still had the foam and everything, even had the plastic film on the glass display side. Talk about a score.

 

Anyway I still need everything else, but the multitude of options is making my brain fizzle.

So this is what I want, a high end gaming computer that can run ultra settings on most modern games with good fps. (60 minimum) I have around 1.6k right now I can spend and have a source of income if I need a bit more, so I can go up to 2k. I also need this to run animation programs but I'm sure that won't be hard when I'm specing this for gaming.

 

It can also handle water cooling systems if that changes anything.

 

Here's some pictures of the case.

 

img_20150926_010518804_by_bgame46-d9bqxc

img_20150926_010712499_by_bgame46-d9bqxb

img_20151003_043057959_by_bgame46-d9bqx9

The crack that made them throw it out <-<

img_20150926_010718952_by_bgame46-d9bqxa

 

Edited by Badshot

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Oh boy, this is gonna be a long post... 

Your budget sounds about right for a high-end rig. 

Case looks nice and big so airflow shouldn't be a problem long as you do your cable management right :awesomecheer:

The hard part is selecting parts that match, usually the end-goal is to have a well rounded selection of parts that won't bottleneck each other, so you can't really cheap out too much on any one part without paying the price (pun not intended) sooner or later. 

Motherboard's are very important so you need to match everything to the motherboard. Ideally I'd suggest you pick the CPU and GPU first as those will be the most expensive parts and where you should devote the majority of your budget, then pick a motherboard that supports those and finally a RAM that matches the board's specs. More expensive motherboards have fancier stuff like Overclocking options, RAIDs and various other nicknacks but that all depends on what and how you'll be using the PC.

CPU (Socket), the RAM (DDR 3 or 4) and the GPU (Crossfire / SLI support) have to match to what your Motherboard supports. So if you pick an AMD CPU with an AM3+ socket, you have to have an AM3+ socket on the Motherboard, the same thing applies to the RAM. The Crossfire / SLI support is a bit more complicated but essentially only matters if you intend to run Dual GPU's like 2 GTX 980's or something, you'll need a Motherboard that supports SLI or Crossfire X for the AMD alternative and a pretty beefy Power supply to handle two GPU's running at the same time. 

As for the parts themselves I can recommend an Intel CPU, as they're currently leaders in Single-thread performance (most programs and games still run on a single thread). AMD's more focused on multi-threading but the benefits from that are tiny and only apply to heavily multi-threaded applications which are few and far between.

The GPU selection is up to user preference. But you really only have two options :

The Pro's for AMD are that you usually get the most bang for your buck, they have great performance, there's a lot of variety and Aftermarket options (Sapphire, Powercooler, Asus, etc) are much better than the stock versions by AMD. Cons are they tend to run hotter than usual, don't support some of Nvidia's specialized stuff like PhysX and some perform worse (depending on the model) than their Nvidia counterpart. 
Nvidia's side is more or less where you'd go if you need the most performance regardless of the cost. Pros for them is excellent performance, good operating temperatures and exclusive stuff like PhysX and Gameworks. Cons are generally the prices, as Nvidia's GPU's come at a ( in some cases very) higher cost than their AMD alternatives.
Best method to pick between them is to compare their Specs and choose the one that fits witin your budget and is supported by your motherboard .

The RAM is a bit trickier:  Generally 8-16 GB of ram is plenty for Gaming so what you need to pay attention to is the Type of Ram (DDR 2/3/4) and the Frequency at which it runs. The type of RAM is very important otherwise the sticks you pick won't even fit into your RAM socket. If your motherboard supports DDR 3 (which is the standard these days as DDR4 is rather expensive) you need to buy DDR3 RAM. The frequency dictates the speed of the RAM stick/s ideally you'll want RAM sticks that support your motherboard's frequencies (they should be in the Mbo's specs when you pick one so keep those in mind). I said Ideally because the RAM will always work at a frequency that is supported by both it and the board it's attached to. Say you buy 16 GB of DDR3 Ram that runs at about 1600Mhz, however your motherboard only supports speeds up to 1333mhz, the ram will still work but it will be bottle necked by the Motherboard at only 1333mhz. 

Hopefully that cleared up... something:giddy:

Here's some helpful resources :

PC Part Picker

Coolermaster's Power Supply Calculator is very useful to see what kind of wattage you'll need for your PSU.

Linus Tech Tips have some great videos on all things PC.

/r/pcmasterrace  are a good place to ask around about your build and get some answers. Beware though, the place gets a bit.. fickle at times.

 

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With that level of cash, go all out. i7, GTX 970 (might be able to swing a 980), 16GB RAM minimum, SSD, watercooling, etc.

 

Avoid the fuck out of AMD GPUs. As much as I'll defend their CPUs (amazing for budget builds/casual users), their GPUs have a history of driver issues dating back to when ATI was the company producing Radeons.

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With that level of cash, go all out. i7, GTX 970 (might be able to swing a 980), 16GB RAM minimum, SSD, watercooling, etc.

 

Avoid the fuck out of AMD GPUs. As much as I'll defend their CPUs (amazing for budget builds/casual users), their GPUs have a history of driver issues dating back to when ATI was the company producing Radeons.

trust me i plan on going all out.

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144 hz monitor is essential.  I see too many ponies blowing lots of money on builds and sticking with a 60 hz monitor.  Also, 2 or 3 monitors if you have space is nice too.

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I can suggest all the parts to you for that budget, but its still not "enough" to run modern games on ultra at 60fps. That is unrealistic right now even with a 3-way Titan X SLI. Yeah you can get average performance on modern games, even max on games like tf2 and csgo. But compare those to GTAV or Far Cry, its a dream yet to come true.

 

But first things first, find out what motherboard mount your case supports first. That is ATX, M-ATX, E-ATx, whatever it has. Thats the form factor you need to look for when getting a mobo, and will also determine if the socket is in a prime location to allow a prebuilt water cooling loop/radiator to be fitted without kinking the tubing too much.

 

Everything else will be icing on the cake. Cause you can go buy all the parts you want, and usually it doesn't fit, then you're out of luck and have to spend more, etc etc. Research your case first for its motherboard form factor and standoffs, and number of fan locations and radiator mounts.

 

Add me on steam if you want a step by step guide from what to do and what to buy in your budget. I build stuff like this for a hobby :P

Edited by Vin

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Its not a money issue, its that technology isnt that advanced yet, and it depends if it satisfies you or not.

 

I can configure a system for you to handle gaming at your budget, below it even. Anything above is a "want" more than a "need"

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