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Depends. Is it rare? Is the price for it high?Is the quality high? Are they specifically made for collectors?(for example, Masterpiece Transformers toys)

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Age and historical availability are key, as well as demand for the item. Small production numbers, (good looking) factory errors, and special event only releases are good to hang on to. If nothing else, hang onto the stuff that makes you happy!

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In practice, "collector's item" is a term used to market something to people who will pay more money for a thing because they collect those things. As opposed to the kid who buys action figures because they're cool, a collector's item is something explicitly designed to appeal to the conscientious curators of specific stuff.

Features generally built into the product to make it a "collector's item" are things like a limited manufacturing/print run to create scarcity, or a human-readable serial number rather than a bar code to foster in the buyer a sense of genuineness and authenticity. A lot of attention will be given to the visual design of the thing, to make it as impressive-looking as possible (for a given set of manufacturing limitations). A limited run of graphic novels might be done with premium paper or a special cover that the mass market version lacks. A statuette will be created from the original source material by a known name in the field, and the mold will be more meticulously detailed than for the action figures churned out in the millions for kids aged 6-12 to throw down the steps and shoot at with pellet guns.

This is different from the other side of collectable items; the things that were always meant to be mass-produced and sold on the common market but which have become important for other reasons. The original run of Detective Comics #27  was never intended to be a collector's item. It was intended to be sold to kids at as many newsstands as possible. It has become valuable to collectors only because time has endowed the story and the creators of it with a massive cultural significance that was never anticipated at the time.

So what I see are two different, diametrically opposed versions of the term. You have items deemed "collector's items" by the companies making and selling them, attempting to force a product into a niche (or force a niche onto a product). A kind of top-down scheme. Then you have the bottom-up version, in which collectors themselves decide what items are worthy of special attention and should be sought out, independent of marketing or production values.

So I guess the best answer is C) Martin Scorcsese. 

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In short: time, initial rarity (which only increases with time) and desirability. If something is from a popular movie for example, like Star Wars, it already has a built-in desirability. Over the years that increases as availability wanes. The attractiveness of the item doesn't change; it only gets stronger as others show interest in it and drive the going prices up to obtain it. Things that came out decades ago are more collectible than the stuff currently on store shelves, that's scarcity versus attainability at work, and people will pay to get their hands on the less obtainable goodies. But if you buy the available stuff now and hold onto it until you have a grey beard reaching to the floor, you'll have a nice collection to be proud of. 

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