M2 Ball

Did you buy anything recently?

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Hmmm.... Most recent purchase:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MZ2JZON

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0051PJSAW

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006O5JGU

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002565UC

I'm using the magnetic hooks to hold coils of pre-terminated fiber optic cable to the roof and doors of my cramped work truck. They're pretty good at it! Really keeps those things wrangled and frees up space in my shelves for other things.
The blades and knife are to replace my Xacto, which walked off mysteriously. I can only assume it's out traveling the world, getting into and out of wacky misadventures that involve cutting a lot of things.
The powerhead is for an aquarium project I'm setting up.

 

Before that:

https://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=TIN1

https://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=TK-AST

https://www.kjmagnetics.com/proddetail.asp?prod=D82E

Look, you can never have enough magnets okay?

 

And before that:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01JKAR1ZM

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01JLYF4KQ

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0142MEAVG

I splurged during the Black Friday sales.

 

And before that:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00009V431

I can't say enough good things about these six-ways. All they lack is magnetized tips... fortunately I happen to have a few magnets that are up to the task.

Also in that order was a pre-order!

https://www.rutgersuniversitypress.org/ignition/9780813595832

At long last, the world's greatest book about rocketry and horrifying chemical playthings nations were juggling during the Space Race is being reprinted! This legendary book has been making the rounds in digital form for decades; now it's finally getting another dead-tree incarnation! An example of the wondrous terrors within:

Quote

Chlorine trifluoride, ClF3, or “CTF” as the engineers insist on calling it, is a colorless gas, a greenish liquid, or a white solid. It boils at 12° (so that a trivial pressure will keep it liquid at room temperature) and freezes at a convenient —76°. It also has a nice fat density, about 1.81 at room temperature.

It is also quite probably the most vigorous fluorinating agent in existence—much more vigorous than fluorine itself. Gaseous fluorine, of course, is much more dilute than the liquid ClF3, and liquid fluorine is so cold that its activity is very much reduced.

All this sounds fairly academic and innocuous, but when it is translated into the problem of handling the stuff, the results are horrendous. It is, of course, extremely toxic, but that’s the least of the problem. It is hypergolic with every known fuel, and so rapidly hypergolic that no ignition delay has ever been measured. It is also hypergolic with such things as cloth, wood, and test engineers, not to mention asbestos, sand, and water —with which it reacts explosively. It can be kept in some of the ordinary structural metals — steel, copper, aluminum, etc. —because of the formation of a thin film of insoluble metal fluoride which protects the bulk of the metal, just as the invisible coat of oxide on aluminum keeps it from burning up in the atmosphere. If, however, this coat is melted or scrubbed off, and has no chance to reform, the operator is confronted with the problem of coping with a metal-fluorine fire. For dealing with this situation, I have always recommended a good pair of running shoes.

Quote

Most of the Navy work on peroxide was not directed toward missiles, but toward what was called “super performance” for fighter planes — an auxiliary rocket propulsion unit that could be brought into play to produce a burst of very high speed — so that when a pilot found six Migs breathing down his neck he could hit the panic button and perform the maneuver known as getting the hell out of here. The reason for the jet fuel was clear enough; the pilot already had it aboard, and so only an oxidizer tank had to be added to the plane.
But here an unexpected complication showed up. The peroxide was to be stored aboard airplane carriers in aluminum tanks. And then suddenly it was discovered that trace quantities of chlorides in peroxide made the latter peculiarly corrosive to aluminum. How to keep traces of chloride out of anything when you’re sitting on an ocean of salt water was a problem whose solution was not entirely obvious.
And there was always the problem of gross pollution. Say that somebody dropped (accidentally or otherwise) a greasy wrench into 10,000 gallons of 90 percent peroxide in the hold of the ship. What would happen — and would the ship survive? This question so worried people that one functionary in the Rocket Branch (safely in Washington) who had apparently been reading Captain Horatio Hornblower, wanted us at NARTS to build ourselves a 10,000-gallon tank, fill it up with 90 percent peroxide, and then drop into it — so help me God — one rat. (He didn’t specify the sex of the rat.) It was with considerable difficulty that our chief managed to get him to scale his order down to one test tube of peroxide and one quarter inch of rat tail.
Carrier admirals are — with good reason — deadly afraid of fire. That was one of the things they had against acid and a hypergolic fuel.
A broken missile on deck — or any sort of shipboard accident that brought fuel and acid together —would inevitably start a fire. On the other hand, they reasoned that jet fuel wouldn’t even mix with peroxide, but would just float on top of it, doing nothing. And if, somehow, it caught fire, it might be possible to put it out — with foam perhaps— without too much trouble.
So, at NARTS we tried it. A few drums of peroxide (about 55 gallons per drum) were poured out into a big pan, a drum or two of JP-4 was floated on top, and the whole thing touched off. The results were unspectacular. The JP burned quietly, tyith occasional patches of flare or fizz burning. And the fire chief moved in with his men and his foam and put the whole thing out without any fuss. End of exercise.
The Lord had his hands on our heads that day — the Bremen, a couple of dozen bystanders, and me.
For when we — and other people — tried it again (fortunately on a smaller scale) the results were different. The jet fuel burns quietly at first, then the flare burning starts coming, and its frequency increases. (That’s the time to start running.) Then, as the layer of JP gets thinner, the peroxide underneath gets warmer, and starts to boil and decompose, and the overlying fuel is permeated with oxygen and peroxide vapor. And then the whole shebang detonates, with absolutely shattering violence.
When the big brass saw a demonstration or two, the reaction was “Not on my carrier!” and that was that.
The Super-P project was dropped for a variety of reasons, but the pan-burning tests were not entirely without influence on the final decision. 

 

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 I bought a Rainbow Dash plushie and a few military pieces, such as an M1910 canteen (Actually named, so it's pretty exciting) and a German M34 cap for the Heer forces. Now I just have to figure out what to buy some family as Christmas gifts.

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I bought a really small PC at a thrift store a little while ago. It's about the size of a VCR and it was only five bucks. It's probably too weak for day-to-day usage, but it will make a nice compact emulator box.

I also saw a Celestia Build-A-Bear plush for $1.99 at that same thrift store a little bit later. Unfortunately, I was too much of a coward to buy it. Honestly though, I don't know what I would have done with it if I had bought it.

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12 hours ago, Netburst Celeron said:

I bought a really small PC at a thrift store a little while ago. It's about the size of a VCR and it was only five bucks. It's probably too weak for day-to-day usage, but it will make a nice compact emulator box.

I also saw a Celestia Build-A-Bear plush for $1.99 at that same thrift store a little bit later. Unfortunately, I was too much of a coward to buy it. Honestly though, I don't know what I would have done with it if I had bought it.

Obviously you would have merged it with the computer and created an artificial god who would grow beyond your control or, indeed, any strictly human limitations or notions at all.

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4 hours ago, ABronyAccount said:

Obviously you would have merged it with the computer and created an artificial god who would grow beyond your control or, indeed, any strictly human limitations or notions at all.

Now I'm imagining a Star Trek style computer with Celestia's voice.

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5 hours ago, ABronyAccount said:

The exchange of currency for the exclusive use of goods or services.

 

You know, theft!

 

Well in that case a humidifier because through the whole middle of last week I was hit with chest congestion with the force of a eighteen wheeler and I needed a way to try and ease the pain until it fucked off.

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I've mostly been buying Christmas presents for my friends and family. I basically did it all in one shot, but the last item of that group of things arrived in the mail yesterday and it was a shirt for my sister-in-law for the show Brooklyn-Nine-Nine.

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